Kitchen Island

You may have read my earlier post where I sawed off my countertop with the intention of creating more counter space by adding a kitchen island. Once my wall was removed (all 5 million wires and 1 large exhaust pipe included) I was going to be able to build my kitchen island.

I had so many ideas and Pins on what my kitchen island would be like. My ultimate inspiration was a combination of this and this. I searched Craigslist for islands, dressers, bars and any mix of the words to see if there was something that I could get for free or cheap to turn into an island. I ended up realizing that I was not going to find something on Craigslist. The things that I was finding were either too expensive or were going to need a complete overhaul. Since the island is going to be the center of my home, I couldn’t afford to be rigging a dresser with drawers that were janky. I understand my own skill set. Demolition is in my wheel house. Precision and fine tuning rickety dressers into amazing kitchen islands is not something I can pull off. Wish I could, but I’m a realist.

I started with figuring out a layout. I talk about how I’m a visual person in an earlier post. I had originally planned on my island running North/South, but when I started laying it out I was concerned about the walk path being too narrow. I started to try and visualize this by placing my broom and some spare wood on the floor. This layout is actually East/West and goes against everything I’d been visualizing for my open concept up to this point. The biggest piece of wood, by the dishwasher door, is for me to gauge where the countertop would come to. I wanted to be sure that the dishwasher was going to be able to open with the entire island buildout.

Kitchen Island Layout

Kitchen Island Layout

The broom and the wood weren’t quite doing it for me. I needed a better visual and I happened to have just the thing! I ended up using my pantry (which I had previously removed from the wall) as my visual guide. I laid it on down on the floor and pushed chairs up to it. Yes! This was it. I was finally able to have confidence in the size of the island that I needed. I understood the walk space around it and knew for certain that there wouldn’t need to be any butt shimmying through areas that were too narrow. I also knew for certain that my dishwasher door would open all of the way without hitting the island.

Visual Guide

Visual Guide

Now that I knew my dimensions and the storage that I wanted I could start building. I purchased 3 unfinished base cabinets in oak. Two of the cabinets are all drawers and the middle cabinet is a drawer with a cabinet.

Base Cabinets

Base Cabinets

Base Cabinets

Base Cabinets

IMG_2169

IMG_2167

You’ll notice that the sliver of a wall and the silver exhaust pipe are gone! The pipe was capped off by a professional HVAC person and now looks like a chicken pot pie in my ceiling. Woot! The only thing remaining is the removal of the curtain of wires. That half wall held the exhaust pipe, 2 light switches, my doorbell, a phone line, 2 outlets, a furnace wire and and air vent. Holy Mackerel Batman!

Capped Hot Water Heater Exhaust Pipe

Capped Hot Water Heater Exhaust Pipe

The kitchen’s upper cabinet doors are also rehung. I’m thrilled at this progress. Now that I have the foundation of my kitchen island in place I’ve started pinning for kitchen island inspiration. Annnnd, once again I needed to remind myself of my skill set. I’m a demolition girl. Trim, molding, finishing, perfection and a lot of moolah are something that most of my kitchen island pins were made of. I got real.

I wrapped the cabinets in 1/8″ B grade plywood and painted the plywood black. I bought 6″ wide planks of cedar (most commonly sold for fences) for trim and 1X4’s of common pine for the baseboard. I didn’t use a miter for the trim or baseboards because angles and math scramble my brain. I have purchased a miter saw, but I haven’t taken it out of the box. Oh-Oh! In case you’re wondering, the cabinet door is not hung because it’s going to be a pull out garbage can. I still need to figure that out, though. The kits for pull out garbage cans are really expensive. I’m sure I can figure out how to do it without a kit. That’ll be a later post.

IMG_2211

Cedar Trim

Cedar Trim + Beginning of a painting experiment

Painting Experiment

Painting Experiment Continued

Full Cedar Trim

Full Cedar Trim

Electrical Box

Electrical Box

I made an island! It’s nice! It’s me! The screws show and it’s “rustic.” I think it turned out super so far. It’s not done, but it’s close. I still want to add metal sheeting to the black areas and plumbers piping along the bottom for foot rests while your pulled up on a stool. I also still need to buy countertops, which will be the crowning jewel – but, so far so good!

Hey-Hey-Hey! I did not install the electrical box. Nope.

I tried electrical for a moment. You can read about my electrical lessons in a later post. I highly recommend hiring a professional for electrical work. Note: one thing that even the professionals should have been more careful about when it came to the island electrical box was that there needs to be clearance for a gal to close her drawer. After this electrical box was installed my middle/right island drawer wouldn’t close. It was a close call. I rearranged the bottom and middle drawers and now the 1/16″ issue where the drawer was hitting the electrical box is resolved.

 

 

 

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